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HOME » PLACES » INDIA » RANATHAMBHORE NATIONAL PARK » RAN - 2011 » White Bellied Drongo
White Bellied Drongo
White Bellied Drongo

As we entered Ranathambhore National Park main gate, we could sight this immediately at the enterance of the gate. With this chap perpendicular to our gypsy, it was indeed difficult for us to shoot him. With the gypsy taking a reverse, a help for us to shoot him at an angle less than 90, tried to lift my bazooka with an angle. Finding it difficult to hand head my bazooka and get a clean and crisp picture of this beauty, could manage to click some. To my luck, I could manage to get some strength to lift it and take some clean shots of this beauty with adpt background.

The White-bellied Drongo (Dicrurus caerulescens) is a species of drongos found only in South Asia, mainly in India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. They are insectivorous and are mainly black in colour but with a white belly and vent. Young birds are however all black and can be confused with the Black Drongo although smaller and more compact in appearance.

This drongo is black without any glossy on the upperside and greyish on the throat and breast while the belly and vent are entirely white in the Indian form which is the nominate subspecies. The fork of the tail is less deep than in the Black Drongo which is often seen in the same habitats. Young Black Drongo's can have a lot of white on the underside but it is usually scaly in appearance.

They perch upright close to the tops of trees and capture insects in the air with short aerobatic sallies. Larger insects may be captured using their claws. The song of this drongo is a series of staccato notes interspersed with clear notes and may include mimicry of other bird calls.

The breeding season is from February to July. The cup nest is similar to that of the Black Drongo but is usually made up of more twigs and is well lined with grass. Two to four eggs, pale salmon coloured with reddish blotches on the broad end, are laid in the nest which may be 20 to 30 feet high in the fork of a tree. These are aggressive at the nest and will potential threats much larger than themselves.

Although primarily insectivorous they are opportunistic and are known to prey on small birds. Like other drongos, they use their feet while handling their prey. They have been known to take insects attracted to artificial lights late at dusk.

Disclaimer: This photograph is taken in the natural habitat. Incase if anybody needs the copy of this picture, please contact me. © All Rights Reserved by Yogesh Rane (www.junglebook.co.in / www.yogeshrane.com)

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 RSS  Disclaimer : This photograph is taken in the natural habitat. Incase if anybody needs the copy of this picture, please contact me. All Rights Reserved by Yogesh Rane (www.junglebook.co.in / www.yogeshrane.com)